Comme des iconoclastes.

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In February, 2013, Comme des Garçons and Hermès were set to release the first part of their collaborative “Comme des Carrés” project. The collection came in the form of five scarves, each printed with a mixture of Hermès’ equine iconography and Comme des Garçons’ artwork, and was released in a limited edition, available only at Comme des Garçons retail locations in Paris, New York and Tokyo, as well as Dover Street Market Ginza and London. I was amazed. Their version of “Couvertures et Tenues de Jour” looked as if if had some freedom fighter like Che Guevara or Daniel Cohn-Bendit as a designer, as if it had been upgraded by political iconoclasm, even the iconic box wasn’t left alone by Comme des Garçons’ jolly impiety, it came with big black dots, and all this beautiful mess seemed to have a tiny fringe group of the jeunesse dorée, still into May 1968 and its spirit of revolution, as the main target group. Not having it in my possession made me quite nervous, I was about to either go cold turkey or to Paris first thing in the morning when German Vogue, where I had just learned all about it, ever so debonairly, gave me Dover Street Market’s online shop web address. A few seconds later, freedom was on its way to me, and I was at ease again. No wonder I had almost gone cold turkey; I was born in May, 1968.

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