Marlene in Paris.

In 1936, Marlene Dietrich entered a jeweller’s shop in Paris and uttered some unforgettable words to me: “I would like to see some pearls”. Some pearls. Not to necessarily buy any, just to see some, in a tone that left no doubt about having some infinite riches on her hands, while suavely smiling, with that ironic twinkle of hers, not in her eye, but in her lips, unmatched sophistication and wit, the sort of smile that demands an IQ way above average, quite Einsteinesque a brain, just with a much better hair-do, or, in that particular case, a hat by Travis Banton, of course, later in that movie it turns out she’s utterly broke, anyway, I was deeply impressed. Deeply. In 1999, I entered the Hermès shop in Cologne, uttering the words “I would like to see some cufflinks.”, but it just wasn’t the same. I had aimed too high. But now that you know about my connection to Marlene Dietrich, I give you Flammarion’s edition of Pierre Passebon’s collection of some of the best photographs ever taken of her, the collection’s still on display in Paris, until February 25th at Maison Européenne de la Photographie in Paris. But if you can’t make it to 5-7, rue de Fourcy in the Marais within the next 48 hours, you just enter a bookshop and repeat after me: “I would like to see some photographs of Marlene Dietrich.”

4 thoughts on “Marlene in Paris.

  1. Thank you for this magnificent tribute to a remarkable woman. I love the anecdote with the pearls and your selection of images. I hope you too can pay homage to her one day in the cemetery in Schöneberg where she’s buried, close to Helmut Newton.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. She is just at her best in this delightful movie ,Desire…so underestimated.Love your story with the cufflinks.I think somehow she just inspire all of us to try to use selfconfidence combined with style and charm and see how far the power of seduction can help us to get the things we want…well at least try.

    Liked by 2 people

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