Comme des iconoclastes.

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In February, 2013, Comme des Garçons and Hermès were set to release the first part of their collaborative “Comme des Carrés” project. The collection came in the form of five scarves, each printed with a mixture of Hermès’ equine iconography and Comme des Garçons’ artwork, and was released in a limited edition, available only at Comme des Garçons retail locations in Paris, New York and Tokyo, as well as Dover Street Market Ginza and London. I was amazed. Their version of “Couvertures et Tenues de Jour” looked as if if had some freedom fighter like Che Guevara or Daniel Cohn-Bendit as a designer, as if it had been upgraded by political iconoclasm, even the iconic box wasn’t left alone by Comme des Garçons’ jolly impiety, it came with big black dots, and all this beautiful mess seemed to have a tiny fringe group of the jeunesse dorée, still into May 1968 and its spirit of revolution, as the main target group. Not having it in my possession made me quite nervous, I was about to either go cold turkey or to Paris first thing in the morning when German Vogue, where I had just learned all about it, ever so debonairly, gave me Dover Street Market’s online shop web address. A few seconds later, freedom was on its way to me, and I was at ease again. No wonder I had almost gone cold turkey; I was born in May, 1968.

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One thought on “Comme des iconoclastes.

  1. I was almost shocked to see the writing on the Hermès scarf but then I read your text, felt even more intrigued and could see straight away why you needed it. I love these stories behind all your elegant things, your passion for style and even learned that you were a child of the revolution. I would never have thought that Comme des garçons and Hermès would go together but then I remembered Godard quoting T.S. Eliot’s dictum from The Waste Land in his film ‘Bande à Part’ that any work that is genuinely new is automatically traditional so perhaps that’s why this design works so beautifully. In any case, thank you for such an elegantly written and thought-provoking article.

    Liked by 1 person

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